Delmi's forthcoming report, Those who were sent back-return and reintegration of rejected Asylum seekers, is funded by the EU Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund (AMIF). Constanza Vera-Larrucea, Assistant Project Manager and one of the authors of the forthcoming report, shares more about the work process during a time characterized by a pandemic.

What has happened in the project since the spring of 2020?

A lot has happened in the project since we have come halfway in the research process. The consulting firm, Samuel Hall, has collected data in both Afghanistan and Iraq with the help of local staff. During the summer, we received about 60 interviews from Afghanistan, which we have read and analyzed. Recently, we also received data from Iraq, a total of 40 interviews. The researchers within Delmi's project group are going through the 1381 pages and are analyzing a very interesting and rich material.

Has data collection been affected by the Corona pandemic?

The pandemic has indeed affected the fieldwork - both its duration and data collection methods. In Afghanistan, most of the data had already been collected when the virus began to spread. The interviews were then conducted "face-to-face" while the rest were conducted via Skype or telephone. However, in Iraq, where the fieldwork was delayed partly due to Covid-19, almost all interviews had to be conducted remotely.

"It is very difficult to reintegrate in a context of political and economic uncertainty. At the same time, we can see that social networks are crucial for achieving sustainable reintegration - even if there is access to reintegration support."


Can you say something about preliminary results?

It is interesting to see the consequences of a migration process that took place under particularly difficult conditions. The vast majority of our respondents came to Sweden during the refugee crisis. Something we have found in our data and which previous research confirms, is how important the situation in the country you return to is to be able to be reintegrated. It is very difficult to reintegrate in a context of political and economic uncertainty. At the same time, we can see that social networks are crucial for achieving sustainable reintegration - even if there is access to reintegration support.

The interview is part of Delmi's newsletter for the autumn of 2020 where you can read more about Delmi's upcoming and published reports and webinars. Subscribe to our mailing list to receive our newsletters, webinar invitations and information about new publications.

Picture by AMIF.